Mixed Martial Arts Rules + Regulations

Amateur Mixed Martial Arts Rules & Regulations

Split or Different Style Events

Cards split between professional and amateur matches shall be left at the discretion of the sanctioning Commissions.

National Database Event Registration

All Promoters are required to register in a timely manner, their event in advance with the Association of Boxing Commissions designated national record keeper, MMA.TV, and receive approval from this agency for each specific requested bout.

Weight Classes of Amateur Mixed Martial Artists

Amateur mixed martial artist shall be divided into the following classes:

  1. Flyweight (125 and under) with not more than a 10 pound spread
  2. Bantamweight (126-135)
  3. Featherweight (136-145)
  4. Lightweight (146-155)
  5. Welterweight (156-170)
  6. Middleweight (171-185)
  7. Light Heavyweight (186-205)
  8. Cruiser Heavyweight (206-230)
  9. Heavyweight (231-265)
  10. Super Heavyweight (over 265)

Weighing of Mixed Martial Artists

Weigh in will be determined at the discretion of the sanctioning Commissions.

Cage

All amateur contests will take place in a cage or ring left at the discretion of the sanctioning Commissions. All rings must adhere to a minimum of five ropes as a standard safety precaution.

Equipment

The appropriate equipment shall be approved at the discretion of the sanctioning Commissions.

Specifications for Bandages on Mixed Martial Artists’ Hands

All mixed martial arts contestants shall be required to gauze and tape their hands prior to all contests. Bandages and tape shall be placed on a contestant’s hands in the dressing room in the presence of the inspector and, if desired, in the presence of the chief second of his or her opponent. Under no circumstances are gloves to be placed on the hands of a contestant until the approval of the inspector is received. Substances other than surgeon’s tape and soft gauze shall not be utilized. Example: pre-wraps shall not be used.

Mouth Pieces

(a) All contestants are required to wear a mouthpiece during competition. The mouthpiece shall be subject to examination and approval by the attending physician. (b) The round cannot begin without the mouthpiece in place.

Protective Equipment

(a) Approved shin guard with instep pads, supplied by the promoter, and in good condition, must be worn by all contestants. (b) Female mixed martial artists may wear a chest protector or other properly fitted sports bra during competition. Chest protectors shall be subject to the approval of the Commission.

Gloves

(a) The gloves shall be in good condition for all contests or they must be replaced. (b) All contestants shall wear gloves at least six ounces supplied by the promoter and approved by the commission. No contestant shall supply his or her own gloves for participation unless approved by the commission.

Apparel

(a) Each contestant shall wear mixed martial arts shorts, biking shorts, or kickboxing shorts. Shorts must be approved by the inspector or commission representative. Shorts with a grip panel are not permitted. Shorts with metal parts are not permitted unless properly covered. (b) Gis, shirts, and biking pants with a grip panel are prohibited during competition for male Contestants. Female competitors must wear rashguard shirts. Male contestants may wear rashguards. (c) Shoes are prohibited during competition.

Appearance

The Commission may prevent any contestant from competing in any match or event due to the contestant’s personal hygiene, length of head hair, length of facial hair, or any other aspects of personal appearance that may present a hazard to the safety of the contestant or their opponent, or that may interfere with the supervision or conduct of the event.

Round Length

All amateur bouts will consist of no more than three, 3 minute rounds with a one minute rest period in between rounds.

Stopping a Contest

The referee and ringside physician are the sole arbiters of a bout and are the only individuals authorized to enter the fighting area at any time during the competition and authorized to stop a contest.

Judging

(a) All bouts will be evaluated and scored by three judges. A commission approved 10 point system of scoring shall be the standard for bouts. (b) Judges shall evaluate mixed martial art techniques, such as effective striking, effective grappling, control of the fighting area, effective aggressiveness and defense. (c) Judges shall consider the amount of successful Executions of legal takedowns and reversals in evaluating effective grappling. Examples of factors judges can consider are the takedowns from standing position to mount position, passing the guard to mount position, and bottom position fighter using as active, threatening guard.

Scoring the Foul to be Performed by the Scorekeeper

Fouls may result in a point being deducted by the official Scorekeeper from the offending mixed martial artist’s score. The Scorekeeper, not the judges, will be responsible for calculating the true score after factoring in the point deduction. Only the referee may assess fouls.

Amateur Mixed Martial Arts bouts shall be contested using either “Novice Division Rules”, designated for fighters who have competed in less than (2) bouts, or using “Advanced Division Rules” for fighters who have competed in more than two (2) verifiable bouts regulated by a recognized commission or state approved sanction body and subject to commission matchmaking approval. The difference between Novice and Advanced division rules is as follows: It is a foul to strike to the head of a grounded fighter in a Novice division bout. In an Advanced division bout it is legal to strike the head of a grounded fighter.

The complete set of fouls are below. Bouts between fighters who have more than three fights may be contested using novice division rules. Bouts between fighters with three fights or less may not be contested using advanced division rules.

Fouls for Novice Division

The following are fouls and will result in penalties such as warning, point deduction or disqualification, if committed:

  1. Holding or grabbing the fence or ropes; a fighter may put their hands on the fence and push off of it at anytime. A fighter may place their feet onto the cage and have their toes go through the fencing material at any time. When a fighter’s fingers or toes go through a cage and grab hold of the fence and start to control with their body position or their opponent’s body position it now becomes an illegal action. A fighter may not grab the ropes or wrap their arms over the ring ropes at any time.If a fighter is caught holding the fence, cage or ring rope material the referee shall issue a one point deduction from the offending fighter’s scorecard if the foul caused a substantial change in position such as the avoidance of a takedown. If a point deduction for holding the fence occurs, and because of the infraction, the fouling fighter ends up in a superior position due to the foul, the fighters should be restarted by the referee, standing in a neutral position.
  2. Holding opponent’s shorts or gloves; a fighter may not control their opponent’s movement by holding onto their opponent’s shorts or gloves. A fighter may hold onto or grab their opponent’s hand as long as they are not controlling the hand only by using the material of the glove, but by actually gripping the hand of the opponent. It is legal to hold onto your gloves or shorts.
  3. Butting with the head; any use of the head as a striking instrument whether head to head, head to body or otherwise is illegal.
  4. Eye gouging; eye gouging of any kind by means of fingers, chin, or elbows is illegal. Legal strikes or punches that contact the fighter’s eye socket are not eye gouging and shall be considered legal attacks.
  5. Biting or spitting at an opponent; biting in any form is illegal. A fighter must recognize that a referee may not be able to physically observe some actions, and must make the referee aware if they are being bitten during an exhibition of unarmed combat.
  6. Hair pulling; pulling of hair is an illegal action.
  7. Fish hooking; any attempt by a fighter to use their fingers in a manner that attacks their opponent’s mouth, nose or ears, stretching the skin to that area will be considered "Fishhooking". Fishhooking generally is the placing of fingers into the mouth of your opponent and pulling your hands in opposing direction while holding onto the skin of your opponent.
  8. Groin attacks of any kind; any attack to the groin area including, striking, grabbing, pinching or twisting is illegal.
  9. Intentional placing finger into any orifice or into any cut or laceration of your opponent. A fighter may not lace their fingers into an open laceration in an attempt to enlarge the cut. A fighter may not place their fingers into an opponent’s nose, ear, mouth, or any other body cavity.
  10. Elbow strikes of any kind to any area.
  11. Small joint manipulation. Fingers and toes are small joints. Wrist, ankles, knees, shoulders and elbows are all large joints.
  12. Strikes to the spine or the back of the head; strikes are not permissible from the nape of the neck area up to the top of the ears. Above the ears, permissible strikes do not include mohawk area from the top of the ears up until the crown of the head. The crown of the head is found where the head begins to curve. In other words, strikes behind the crown of the head and above the ears are not permissible within the mohawk area.
  13. Heel kicks to the kidney.
  14. No throat strikes of any kind are allowed; a directed attack would include a fighter pulling his or her opponent’s head in a way to open the neck for a striking attack, a fighter may not gouge their fingers or thumb into their opponent’s neck or trachea in an attempt to submit their opponent.
  15. Clawing, pinching, twisting the flesh or grabbing the clavicle; Any attack that targets the fighter’s skin by clawing at the skin or attempting to pull or twist the skin to apply pain is illegal. Any manipulation of the clavicle is a foul.
  16. Kicking the head of a downed opponent.
  17. Kneeing the head of an opponent.
  18. Stomping of a grounded fighter; stomping is considered any type of striking action with the feet where the fighter lifts their leg up bending their leg at the knee and initiating a striking action with the bottom of their foot or heel. Note: Axe kicks are not stomps. Standing foot stomps are NOT a foul. As such, this foul does not include stomping the feet of a standing fighter.
  19. The use of abusive language in the fighting arena.
  20. Any unreasonable conduct of any kind that may causes an injury to opponent or any officials.
  21. Attacking an opponent on or during the break. A fighter shall not engage their opponent in any fashion during a timeout or break of action in competition.
  22. Attacking an opponent who is under the care of the referee.
  23. Timidity; timidity is defined as any fighter who purposely avoids contact with his opponent, or runs away from the action of the fight. Timidity can also be called by the referee for any attempt by a fighter to receive time by falsely claiming a foul, injury, or purposely dropping or spitting our their mouthpiece or other action designed to stall the fight.
  24. Interference from a corner; interference is defined as any action or activity aimed at disrupting the fight or causing an unfair advantage to be given to one combatant. Corners are not allowed to distract the referee or influence the actions of the referee or any other official.
  25. Throwing an opponent out of the cage or ring fighting area; a fighter shall not throw their opponent out of the cage.
  26. Flagrant disregard of the referee’s instructions; a fighter MUST follow the instructions of the referee at all times. Any deviation of noncompliance may result in the fighter’s disqualification.
  27. Spiking the opponent to the floor onto the head or neck; illegal spiking is considered to be any maneuver where you control your opponent’s body and then forcibly drive your opponents head or neck into the flooring material. Some examples of illegal spiking moves are pile drivers and suplexes. A pile driver is considered to be any throw where you control your opponent’s body placing his feet straight up in the air with his head straight down and then forcibly drive your opponents head into the flooring material. A suplex has several variations but generally consists of lifting your opponent off the flooring material and then using their body weight to drive the opponent down onto the flooring material on their head or neck. It should be noted when a fighter is placed into a submission hold by their opponent, if that fighter is capable of elevating their opponent, they may bring that opponent down in any fashion they desire because they are not in control of their opponents body. The fighter who is attempting the submission can either adjust their position, or let go of their hold before being slammed to the floor.
  28. Attacking an opponent after the bell or horn has sounded the end of the period of unarmed combat.
  29. Linear kicks to the knee joint.
  30. Neck cranks; any hold that places the fighter’s neck in jeopardy from a crank is illegal. Neck cranks such as the “Can Opener” or “Bulldog” are examples of an illegal neck attack, unless the contestant is in their guard and refuses to open their guard.
  31. All twisting leg submissions; heel hooks and toe holds are prohibited. Straight knee bars and the straight ankle locks are allowed.
  32. Spine locks.
  33. Strikes to the head of a grounded opponent.

Fouls for Advanced Division

Advanced Amateur Rules are allowed to be used after a fighter has had two (2), verifiable, amateur fights regulated by a recognized athletic commission, and subject to commission matchmaking approval. All rules for Stage 2 amateur fights are the same as amateur rules with the exception that strikes to the head on the ground are NOT fouls.

The following are fouls and will result in penalties such as warning, point deduction or disqualification, if committed:

  1. Holding or grabbing the fence or ropes; a fighter may put their hands on the fence and push off of it at anytime. A fighter may place their feet onto the cage and have their toes go through the fencing material at any time. When a fighter’s fingers or toes go through a cage and grab hold of the fence and start to control with their body position or their opponent’s body position it now becomes an illegal action. A fighter may not grab the ropes or wrap their arms over the ring ropes at any time. If a fighter is caught holding the fence, cage or ring rope material the referee shall issue a one point deduction from the offending fighter’s scorecard if the foul caused a substantial change in position such as the avoidance of a takedown. If a point deduction for holding the fence occurs, and because of the infraction, the fouling fighter ends up in a superior position due to the foul, the fighters should be restarted by the referee, standing in a neutral position.
  2. Holding opponent’s shorts or gloves; a fighter may not control their opponent’s movement by holding onto their opponent’s shorts or gloves. A fighter may hold onto or grab their opponent’s hand as long as they are not controlling the hand only by using the material of the glove, but by actually gripping the hand of the opponent. It is legal to hold onto your gloves or shorts.
  3. Butting with the head; any use of the head as a striking instrument whether head to head, head to body or otherwise is illegal.
  4. Eye gouging; eye gouging of any kind by means of fingers, chin, or elbows is illegal. Legal strikes or punches that contact the fighter’s eye socket are not eye and gouging and shall be considered legal attacks.
  5. Biting or spitting at an opponent; biting in any form is illegal. A fighter must recognize that a referee may not be able to physically observe some actions, and must make the referee aware if they are being bitten during an exhibition of unarmed combat.
  6. Hair pulling; pulling of hair is an illegal action.
  7. Fish hooking; any attempt by a fighter to use their fingers in a manner that attacks their opponent’s mouth, nose or ears, stretching the skin to that area will be considered "Fishhooking". Fishhooking generally is the placing of fingers into the mouth of your opponent and pulling your hands in opposing direction while holding onto the skin of your opponent.
  8. Groin attacks of any kind; any attack to the groin area including, striking, grabbing, pinching or twisting is illegal.
  9. Intentional placing finger into any orifice or into any cut or laceration of your opponent; a fighter may not lace their fingers into an open laceration in an attempt to enlarge the cut. A fighter may not place their fingers into an opponent’s nose, ear, mouth, or any other body cavity.
  10. Elbow strikes of any kind to any area.
  11. Small joint manipulation; fingers and toes are small joints. Wrist, ankles, knees, shoulders and elbows are all large joints.
  12. Strikes to the spine or the back of the head; strikes are not permissible from the nape of the neck area up to the top of the ears. Above the ears, permissible strikes do not include mohawk area from the top of the ears up until the crown of the head. The crown of the head is found where the head begins to curve. In other words, strikes behind the crown of the head and above the ears are not permissible within the mohawk area.
  13. Heel kicks to the kidney.
  14. No throat strikes of any kind are allowed; a directed attack would include a fighter pulling his or her opponent’s head in a way to open the neck for a striking attack, a fighter may not gouge their fingers or thumb into their opponent’s neck or trachea in an attempt to submit their opponent.
  15. Clawing, pinching, twisting the flesh or grabbing the clavicle; Any attack that targets the fighter’s skin by clawing at the skin or attempting to pull or twist the skin to apply pain is illegal. Any manipulation of the clavicle is a foul.
  16. Kicking the head of a downed opponent.
  17. Kneeing the head of an opponent.
  18. Stomping of a grounded fighter; stomping is considered any type of striking action with the feet where the fighter lifts their leg up bending their leg at the knee and initiating a striking action with the bottom of their foot or heel. (Note) Axe Kicks are not stomps. Standing foot stops are NOT a foul. As such, this foul does not include stomping the feet of a standing fighter.
  19. The use of abusive language in the fighting arena.
  20. Any unreasonable conduct of any kind that may causes an injury to opponent or any officials.
  21. Attacking an opponent on or during the break. A fighter shall not engage their opponent in any fashion during a timeout or break of action in competition.
  22. Attacking an opponent who is under the care of the referee.
  23. Timidity; timidity is defined as any fighter who purposely avoids contact with his opponent, or runs away from the action of the fight. Timidity can also be called by the referee for any attempt by a fighter to receive time by falsely claiming a foul, injury, or purposely dropping or spitting our their mouthpiece or other action designed to stall the fight.
  24. Interference from a corner; Interference is defined as any action or activity aimed at disrupting the fight or causing an unfair advantage to be given to one combatant. Corners are not allowed to distract the referee or influence the actions of the referee or any other official.
  25. Throwing an opponent out of the cage or ring fighting area; A fighter shall not throw their opponent out of the cage.
  26. Flagrant disregard of the referee’s instructions; A fighter MUST follow the instructions of the referee at all times. Any deviation of noncompliance may result in the fighter’s disqualification.
  27. Spiking the opponent to the floor onto the head or neck; Illegal spiking is considered to be any maneuver where you control your opponent’s body and then forcibly drive your opponents head or neck into the flooring material. Some examples of illegal spiking moves are pile drivers and suplexes. A pile driver is considered to be any throw where you control your opponent’s body placing his feet straight up in the air with his head straight down and then forcibly drive your opponents head into the flooring material. A suplex has several variations but generally consists of lifting your opponent off the flooring material and then using their body weight to drive the opponent down onto the flooring material on their head or neck. It should be noted when a fighter is placed into a submission hold by their opponent, if that fighter is capable of elevating their opponent, they may bring that opponent down in any fashion they desire because they are not in control of their opponents body. The fighter who is attempting the submission can either adjust their position, or let go of their hold before being slammed to the floor.
  28. Attacking an opponent after the bell or horn has sounded the end of the period of unarmed combat.
  29. Linear kicks to the knee joint.
  30. Neck cranks; Any hold that places the fighter’s neck in jeopardy from a crank is illegal. Neck cranks such as the “Can Opener” or “Bulldog” are examples of an illegal neck attack, unless the contestant is in their guard and refuses to open their guard.
  31. All Twisting leg submissions; Heel hooks and toe holds are prohibited. Straight Kneebars and the straight ankle locks are allowed.
  32. Spine locks.

Use of Vaseline, Water and Other Similar Substances

The use of body grease, gels, balms, lotions, oil or other substances is a violation and is prohibited from being applied to the hair, face, or body. This includes excessive amounts of water being discarded in a manner at the designated time could be penalized or subject to disqualification.

Foul Procedures

If a foul is committed, the referee shall:

  1. Call time;
  2. Check the fouled mixed martial artist’s condition and safety; and
  3. Assess the foul to the offending contestant, deduct points, and notify each corner’s seconds, judges and the official scorekeeper.

If a bottom contestant commits a foul, unless the top contestant is injured, the fight will continue, so to not jeopardize the top contestant’s superior positioning at the time.

  1. The referee shall verbally notify the bottom contestant of the foul.
  2. When the round is over, the referee shall assess the foul and notify both corners’ seconds, the judges and the official scorekeeper.
  3. The referee may terminate a bout based on the severity of a foul. For such a flagrant foul, a contestant shall lose by disqualification.

Time Considerations for Fouls

Low Blow Foul: A fighter who has been struck with a low blow is allowed up to five minutes to recover from the foul as long as in the ringside doctor’s opinion the fighter may possibly continue on in the contest. If the fighter states that they can continue on before the five minutes of time have expired; the referee shall as soon as practical restart the fight. If the fighter goes over the five minute time allotment the fight cannot be restarted and the contest must come to an end with the outcome determined by the round and time in which the fight was stopped.

Fighter Who is Not Fouled by Low Blow but Another Foul: If a contest or exhibition of mixed martial arts is stopped because of an accidental foul, the referee shall determine whether the unarmed combatant who has been fouled can continue or not. If the unarmed combatant's chance of winning has not been seriously jeopardized as a result of the foul and if the foul did not involve a concussive impact to the head of the unarmed combatant who has been fouled, the Referee may order the contest or exhibition continued after a recuperative interval of not more than 5 minutes. Immediately after separating the unarmed combatants, the Referee shall inform the Commission's representative of his determination that the foul was accidental.

If a fighter is fouled by a blow that the referee deems illegal, the referee should stop the action and call for time. The referee may take the injured fighter to the ringside doctor and have the ringside doctor examine the fighter as to their ability to continue on in the contest. The ringside doctor has up to 5 minutes to make their determination. If the ringside doctor determines that the fighter can continue in the contest, the referee shall as soon as practical restart the fight. However, unlike the low blow foul rule, the fighter does not have up to 5 minutes of time to use at their discretion.

For a foul other than a low blow, the fouled fighter is not guaranteed 5 minutes of recovery time. If deemed not fit to continue by the referee or ringside physician, the referee must immediately call a halt to the bout. If the fighter is deemed not fit to continue by the referee or ringside physician but some of the five minute foul time is still remaining, the fighter cannot avail himself of the remaining time. If the referee stops the contest and employs the use of the ringside doctor, the ringside physician's examinations shall not exceed five minutes. If five minutes is exceeded, the fight cannot be restarted and the contest must end.

Injuries Sustained During Competition

(a) If an injury sustained during competition as a result of a legal maneuver is severe enough to terminate a bout, the injured contestant loses by technical knockout.

(b) If an injury sustained during competition as a result of an intentional foul is severe enough to terminate a bout, the contestant causing the injury loses by disqualification.

(c) If an injury is sustained during competition as a result of an intentional foul and the bout is allowed to continue, the referee shall notify the scorekeeper to automatically deduct two points from the contestant who committed the foul.

(d) If an injury sustained during competition as a result of intentional foul causes the injured contestant to be unable to continue at a subsequent point in the contest, the injured contestant shall win by technical decision, if he or she is ahead on the score cards. If the injured contestant is even or behind on the score cards at the time of stoppage, the outcome of the bout shall be declared a technical draw.

(e) If a contestant injures himself or herself while attempting to foul his or her opponent, the referee shall not take any action in his or her favor, and the injury shall be treated in the same manner as an injury produced by a fair blow.

(f) If an injury sustained during competition as a result of an accidental foul is severe enough for the referee to stop the bout immediately, the bout shall result in a no contest if stopped before two rounds have been completed in a three round bout.

(g) If an injury sustained during competition as a result of an accidental foul is severe enough for the referee to stop the bout immediately, the bout shall result in a technical decision awarded to the contestant who is ahead on the score cards at the time the bout is stopped only when the bout is stopped after two rounds of a three round bout.

(h) There should be scoring of an incomplete round. If the referee penalizes either contestant, then the appropriate points shall be deducted when the scorekeeper calculates the final score for the partial round.

Types of Bout Results

The following are the types of bout results:

  1. Submission by: i. Tap Out: When a contestant physically uses his hand to indicate that he or she no longer wishes to continue; or ii. Verbal Tap Out: When a contestant verbally announces to the referee that he or she does not wish to continue; or makes audible sounds such as screams indicating pain or discomfort. iii. Technical Submission: When a submission is executed to its completeness which cause the referee to intervene and stop the contest. Example, a choke causes a fighter to go unconscious, or a joint lock causes a fracture.
  2. Technical knockout by: i. referee stops bout; ii. ringside physician stops bout; or iii. when an injury as a result of a legal maneuver is severe enough to terminate a bout.
  3. Knockout by failure to rise from the canvas.
  4. Decision via Score Cards: i. Unanimous: When all three judges score the bout for the same contestant; ii. Split Decision: When two judges score the bout for one contestant and one judge scores for the opponent; or iii. Majority Decision: When two judges score the bout for the same contestant and one judge scores a draw.
  5. Draws: i. Unanimous: When all three judges score the bout a draw; ii. Majority: When two judges score the bout a draw; or iii. Split: When all three judges score differently and the score total results in a draw.
  6. Disqualification: When an injury sustained during competition as a result of an intentional foul is severe enough to terminate the contest.
  7. Forfeit: When a contestant fails to begin competition or prematurely ends the contest for reasons other than injury or by indicating a tap out.
  8. Technical Draw: When an injury sustained during competition as a result of an intentional foul causes the injured contestant to be unable to continue and the injured contestant is even or behind on the score cards at the time of stoppage; or in Double Knockout Situations, the referee shall stop a contest or exhibition of unarmed combat at any stage if the referee determines that both unarmed combatants are in such a condition that to continue might subject the unarmed combatants to serious injury.
  9. Technical Decision: When the bout is prematurely stopped due to injury and a contestant is leading on the score cards.
  10. No Contest: When a contest is prematurely stopped due to accidental injury and a sufficient number of rounds have not been completed to render a decision via the score cards.

Licensing

All Fighters, first and seconds MUST be Licensed with the USMTA (United States Muay Thai Association).

Officials

All officials Must be ABC compliant (Have taken and passed an ABC approved course) and licensed with the USMTA.

Medicals

All fighters must provide the following documents before competing: HepB, HepC, and HIV, also known as Combative 3 bloodwork, and a letter from the fighters PCP (Primary Care Doctor) on a letter head, stating said fighter is healthy to compete.

Insurance

Insurance requirements will be determined at the discretion of the sanctioning Commissions.

Ambulance, EMTs, and Qualified Ringside Physician (Medical Team)

A qualified ringside physician shall be present at all events. A qualified ringside physician must be at ringside or cageside during each bout. A qualified ringside physician shall be either a M.D. or D.O.

All promoters must provide an ambulance to be present at all times, from the commencement of the first bout, throughout the duration of the event, and until the last fighter leaves the arena. No contest shall be allowed to continue or commence if an ambulance is utilized to transport a previous contestant to a medical facility, until another ambulance is available and present at the event.

There shall be at least two Emergency Medical Technicians present at all times, from the commencement of the first bout, throughout the duration of the event, and until the last fighter leaves the arena.

No contest shall be allowed to continue or commence if an ambulance is utilized to transport a previous contestant to a medical facility, until another replacement technician crew is available and present at the event.

Promoters License

Promoters licensing will be determined at the discretion of the sanctioning Commissions.

Matchmaker License

Matchmaker licensing will be determined at the discretion of the sanctioning Commissions.

Show Date Request

Sanctioning application MUST be submitted no less than 30 days prior to event.

Age

An amateur contest must attain the age of 18 years on the date of the contest.

Rules Meeting

Rules meetings will be conducted by the USMTA Head official at the event.

Consumables Before and During the Contest

Only water or an approved electrolyte drink by the Sanctioning Body may be consumed during the bout. Contestants should not consume energy drinks on the date of the contest. There will be No other drinks than those mentioned in the locker room by anyone at anytime.

Pre-Fight Medical Check

All fighters will have a pre figh check by event Dr before competing.